International Construction Law Alliance Takes Shape

Jan 20, 2021

NEW YORK, NY – Under the banner Leading Construction Lawyers (LCL), an international construction law alliance has been formed by construction law practices: Peckar & Abramson, PC (United States); Altana (France); Breyer Rechtsanwälte (Germany); and the consulting and dispute resolution firm PS Consulting, based in Paris.

The newly formed LCL Alliance will serve the construction and infrastructure industry’s need for multinational excellence in construction legal services, and as an international forum for related leadership in addressing industry concerns. LCL Alliance members have a client-focused and industry-engaged approach.

Robert Peckar

According to a Jan 2021 press release: The primary goal of the LCL Alliance is to support one another in delivering outstanding results and pragmatic solutions, strategies and advice; all in the interest of serving clients of member firms in connection with a wide range of projects around the world, from infrastructure, transportation, energy, oil & gas, to industrial and building projects.

The LCL Alliance’s mission is to support member firms in offering the highest level of construction-related legal services to stakeholders at all project stages throughout Europe, the Americas, Asia and the Gulf. At the heart of LCL Alliance’s mission is collaboration among the most preeminent construction law firms and practitioners around the globe…Collectively, the LCL Alliance has more than 130 professionals and technical consultants present in various jurisdictions in Europe and the United States. Visit www.lclalliance.com for more information.

An LCL Alliance webinar is set for Feb. 17 from 11:00 a.m. Eastern – Noon. Click Here to register for an International Discussion on Contractors’ Assumption of Design Liability. Topics will include: What is Meant by “Design”?; General Legal Principals of Design Risk Allocation Among Jurisdictions; History and Evolution of Design Responsibility; Common Contractual Practices; and The Role of “Duty to Warn.”

Biden Will Ask OSHA to Reexamine Coronavirus Standards

WASHINGTON, DC – A late December missive from then president-elect Joseph Biden detailed a list of shortcomings at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

“The number of OSHA inspectors is at its lowest level since 1975, while millions of essential workers are working to keep the country functioning through the pandemic,” wrote Biden. “My administration will ask OSHA to determine whether to establish an emergency temporary standard to keep workers safe from COVID-19. I will direct OSHA to enforce worker safety requirements, target the worst violators, and work to increase the number of OSHA inspectors to get the job done. And, I will direct OSHA and other relevant agencies to develop comprehensive strategies for addressing the most dangerous hazards workers encounter in the workplace.”